editorial.no.46.1


TWENTY-five days before Election Day on Nov. 8, the latest NBC/Wall Street Journal survey of likely voters around the country reveals 52 percent will vote in favor of Hillary Clinton and 38 percent for Donald Trump.

In New York, the same survey gave Mrs. Clinton 100 percent chance of winning, while Donald Trump, 0 percent.

Same results in New Jersey, 100-0 chance of winning in favor of Hillary Clinton.

Nationwide voters gave Mrs. Clinton a 76 percent chance of winning.

While Donald Trump, 24 percent chance.

The above reflected the situation of the Trump campaign as he entered the debate arena last Sunday evening.

As a consequence of an indecent tape disclosure which showed Mr. Trump bragging that he could do anything to a woman sexually, married or not, because he was a popular guy.

The tape revelation caused a number of Republican leaders in the already divided Republican Party, like Sen. John McCain, to withdraw their support from Donald Trump.  

So, when he entered the debate arena, he looked glum and exhausted.

Here was how one respected mainstream newspaper reported on the latest debate minutes after it was over:

“Donald J. Trump’s campaign appeared to be crumbling as he entered the second presidential debate against Hillary Clinton, with Republicans withdrawing support for his candidacy after the disclosure of a vulgar recording that showed him bragging about sexual assault. Facing a barrage of tough questions, the Republican nominee managed to scrape through, evading questions, fabricating answers and attacking his opponent in deeply personal terms.

“While expectations for Mr. Trump were low, many commentators and critics thought that he exceeded them and allayed concerns among supporters that his candidacy was finished.”

Guy Benson, political editor at the website Townhall observed, “He (Trump) improved, exceeded expectations, decisively won several exchanges. She (Clinton) could have landed a death blow tonight and did not.”

It has been said that presidential debates have big influence on American voters.

Next Wednesday, Oct. 19, is the third and final presidential debate.

Let’s watch.


editorial.no.46.2