LINDSAY Lohan will not live another day in Singapore, the most progressive city-state in Asia.

But it is also tightly controlled.

If Ms. Lohan is ever convicted of shoplifting there, it’s an automatic seven years in jail.

For other ordinary offenses like spitting in the street or wearing long hair by men, the initial punishment is stroking or caning, once or twice, plus community service.

It is also the most sanitary.

Nary a stray litter in crowded main artery Orchard Street, where tall spanking buildings touch the sky and ultra-chic store outlets are lined cheek by jowl.

Last Friday, it was General Election, a public holiday, but the streets were alive with the sound of ka-ching of cash registers.

For a one-party government, the results were predictable.

But the tiny opposition was more active this time, winning four new seats in Parliament where there were just two seats before that.

But five candidates from the Workers Party, one of six opposition parties, defeated two cabinet ministers.

The vote reflects the views of a younger generation clamoring for “a type of more normal democracy.”

There is voter discontent over rising prices, particularly in housing, and a widening income.

Many Singaporeans also resent the growing number of foreign workers who now make up one-third of the population of five million.

You are bound to meet a Filipino in department stores, in hotel wait staff, in airports, doing menial jobs but at better pay than if working at home.

But the man who wrote the Singapore success story moving it from a third world to a first world is very much around.

At 87, former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew was reelected last Friday to Parliament in the election’s only uncontested race.

He holds what amounts to a lifetime cabinet post of Minister Mentor, or MM, as the locals reverently call him.

What a tribute to a man who turned a once sleepy British port into Asia’s wealthiest and fastest-growing nation.

Perhaps, in his sunset years, he will turn Singapore into a working democracy.