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THE past week had been extremely interesting...and weird, too.

I’m referring to the 8-week-old administration of Uncle Digong Duterte.

He is bold in domestic politics but, apparently, naïve in international political affairs.

The Philippines does not even have an ambassador in Washington, D.C. at a time like this when big and sensitive issues of national concern are occurring on a daily basis.

Although, his determined and fearless efforts to make the native country drug-free, crime-free and corruption-free (except for extrajudicial killings) are commendable.

No other Filipino leader had done what Uncle Digong has started doing.

Ferdinand Marcos had to declare martial law and became a dictator with a suspended Constitution and hundreds of presidential decrees before he instituted similar bold measures.

President Duterte, a lawyer, claims his adherence to the Constitution and to the laws of his land are uncompromising.

But, his approach to anti-drug campaign is now being questioned and noticed around the world.

Extrajudicial killings are continuing everyday.

According to Philippine National Police Chief Ronald dela Rosa, as of Aug. 22, 2016, 1,916 had been killed, both in police operations and by unidentified gunmen.

Evidently, the police officers are emboldened by the “shoot to kill” order of their superiors and the President himself.

On the other hand, the suspected drug-traffickers prepare for the worst and arm themselves in self-preservation knowing what is coming to them.

What if, instead of shock and awe, (or bang, bang, patay!), the government started (from the beginning of the campaign) with suasion and rehabilitation?

Last Tuesday morning, a group of human rights activists in New York, around 50, marched in Manhattan wearing black T-shirts and carrying white placards with bold black prints.

In front of the marchers were two ladies carrying a black sign with white letters, which read, “Duterte End the Mass Murder.”

Other placards read: “Justice for the victims of Extra Judicial Killings.”

“Duterte is a mass murderer.”

“Please Stop the Killing.”

The demonstrators stopped in front of the Philippine Consulate on Fifth Avenue.

Three of the marchers, including a Filipina OFW, spoke and denounced the killings in the Philippines and pleaded with President Duterte to stop the killings.

The UN spoke, too

Earlier, the United Nations, likewise, spoke against extrajudicial killings in Manila.

Uncle Digong did not like what was said and considered it undue interference in the internal affairs and sovereign functions of the Philippines.

In his irritation, Mr. Duterte said he was taking the Philippines out of the United Nations as a member nation.

However, one of his skillful (they are skillful) spin doctors explained the President’s remark was a hyperbole.

Meaning, it was merely an exaggerated statement not meant to be taken literally and seriously.


***


We reiterate our stand that we wish the Philippine President all the best in his crusade for the Philippines and the Filipino people.

But, we are against the killing fields going on.

We are against extrajudicial killings.

We are against those who take the law in their own hands.

That’s not how democracy is supposed to work.

President Duterte is a classic Machiavellian.

He wants to be loved and feared.

He is succeeding as such.

But, how long?

We want him to succeed in his determined efforts to change his country.

Machiavellian political methods and principles of expediency and of the end justifying the means have long been abandoned by political operatives.

History taught us that such principles are almost always wrong and immoral.

Even short cuts, in real life, are ill-advised.

Let me close this subject with parts of an opening statement by a Filipina senator, Risa Hontiveros, during the recent Senate Investigation on Extra Judicial Killings held in Manila.

Speaking of the desired results of President Duterte’s anti-drugs campaign, she said in Tagalog, “Hindi dapat mauwi ang kampanya sa bilang ng mga patay. Dapat, mauwi sa bilang ng mga buhay na napabuti; at buhay na nailigtas. It must be a just campaign to promote new beginnings.”


             
FGM


For the first time, a tradition among women in a remote village in the Republic of Dagestan in the Russian Republics was documented.  

The practice is called Female Genital Mutilation or FGM.

It is the counterpart of circumcision in men.

But, the intended effect is opposite.

FGM involves alteration of sex organ of young girls in that community at ages between 3 and 11.

(Call or text or Google if you want to know exactly how FGM is done. I don’t want to write it here.)

It is believed that in so doing, it will reduce female sexual desire and, thus, prevent a life of immorality or promiscuity.

A religious leader in the area said in a media interview FGM is a “healthy custom.”

Human rights groups, however, consider the practice as cruel and violent and violates human rights.

My observations and questions:

I wonder if the Russians who are doing this FGM are aware of G spot and are also doing something about it?

I also wonder, if Uncle Digong Duterte is serious and not hyperbolic in his charge that his “favorite” senator is, indeed, an “immoral woman,” perhaps, this story could be of help?

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