Potpourri

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ALTHOUGH there may be no aspect of men’s healthcare more controversial than prostate cancer screening, for the most part, routine prostate cancer screening is no longer recommended for all men — rather, experts advocate engaging in shared decision-making with your physician, carefully reviewing the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening before saying yes or no, says the July 2015 issue of the Cleveland Clinic Men’s Health Advisor.

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FOR some individuals, the decision to undergo elective total knee replacement is relatively clear-cut — you may have unrelenting pain and stiffness that limit everyday activities and interfere with sleep, your symptoms don’t respond to drugs or other treatment, and you have a low risk for surgical complications — in which case, you may have an ideal candidate for the procedure, says the Special Spring/Summer issue of the Scientific American — healthafter 50.

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SCIENTISTS are finding that gratitude, when exhibited as a regular part of life not only helps explain a high sense of well-being but also can be fostered in simple ways to increase happiness and fulfillment, says the March 2015 issue of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

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THE Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last December gave the green light to doctors to use a simple non-fasting blood test, called the PLAC test, that predicts heart attack in individuals with no history of heart disease because, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost two-thirds of women and one-half of men who die suddenly of a heart attack or other event caused by coronary heart disease (CHD) have no previous symptoms of heart disease, says the April 2015 issue of the Johns HopkinsScientific American — healthafter50.

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TO try to better align treatment goals with the best available evidence, a panel of experts recently revisited national high blood pressure guidelines - their conclusions offer a few tweaks directed especially at older adults and those with diabetes and kidney disease, says the Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

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